Dr. Amy Gandy, a researcher at the University of Sheffield, supported an investigation into how funding policies affect equality and diversity in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine


University of Sheffield lecturer helps launch inquiry

University of Sheffield lecturer helps launch inquiry

Dr. Amy Gandy, a researcher at the University of Sheffield, has helped to launch a parliamentary inquiry into how funding policies affect equality and diversity in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM).

An open call to the public

The inquiry is one of four taken forward by the House of Commons Science and Technology Select Committee, after an open call using the hashtag #MyScienceInquiry.

The #MyScienceInquiry tag asked the science community and the general public to suggest topics for investigation, related to science and technology. A diverse group of over 200 signatories working in STEMM disciplines, including nine from the University of Sheffield, came together to propose an investigation into diversity within UK research funding streams.

Creating a cultural change

Amy, a researcher and lecturer in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Sheffield, supported the proposal because she thinks the procedures involved in current funding schemes are not inclusive.

“In terms of the funding schemes available to researchers working in STEMM subjects, the deadlines set are not flexible to support different working patterns. Also, I think there is an unconscious bias of reviewers, which has never been addressed," explains Amy.

"Carrying out this inquiry to reveal the true extent of the problem will hopefully force an essential cultural change, to ensure we all have equal opportunities, which will greatly enhance research within the UK.”

Dr. Candice Majewski, Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Sheffield, added: “This inquiry will give us a real opportunity to understand what works, or doesn’t work, within our research funding systems, and how we can change things for the better as we move forward. Even during this stage of the process I’ve been really inspired by the number of people actively engaged in working towards a fairer, more diverse STEMM research landscape, and can’t wait to see what great things we can achieve together in the future.”

Join talented women like Amy at the University of Sheffield

With a strong commitment to diversity, inclusion and gender equality, there are plenty of opportunities for strong candidates in a host of academic and support roles at the University of Sheffield. Search and apply for exciting and challenging jobs today.

 

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Disclosure: Where Women Work researches and publishes insightful evidence about how its paid member organizations support women's equality.

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